HSP: living a creative life, it’s worth the effort

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At the moment I am in the train on my way to Utrecht to give a training on HSP and communicating your bounderies. This gives me time to have a little tête-à-tête with you on this insta-couch and facebook page.

I am so freaking proud of my hubby Arnold. To me he is thé example of a highly sensitive man chasing his ultimate dream. And to some extent we are in this together living our creative life based on our talents. But there are differences. The main difference is that Arnold is most happy when he or someone else puts a camera in front of his face so he can share his take on life. I am most happy when I see people processing their deepest limiting/ destructive emotions.

I’ll take you on a quick tour through his creative journey.

💫 He started out life with three nutrition titles on his name: two bachelors and one master.

💫 He never started a job based on those titles. Instead he ran his capoeira organization for 10 years: a capoeira group and giving all kinds of capoeira workhops to children and adults.

💫 During start-up of his capoeira organization a burn-out took him down. (And still dealing with a continuous headache while pursuing his ultimate dream)

💫 If determination would be a title given out by higher education establishments he would be given this title. While running his capoeira organization he pursued his dream to tell jokes on stage as a comedian. These 4 years were characterized by achievements and setbacks, but in general every step took him closer to be at ease with the most happy, cheerful and light version of himself.

💫 *deep sigh* And now finally he is putting in practice what the comedy world taught him: to simply be himself doing the things in life which gives him the most pleasure and joy. Parallel to this very important aspect he gets paid doing so. Living a highly sensitive creative life is possible. It’s not easy, but it’s gratifying to the max!!

Head over to his Insta @arnoldbalde to see what he is up too.
Like & follow his facebook page to support this crazy and super sensitive goal-orientated creator: https://www.facebook.com/voedinggezondheidleven/

Thanks a lot!

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Eat greens and your child will follow

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So this is how we do it. When I do grocery shopping with my kids, this little fellow wants to push his own cart. As you can see it’s filled with lots of greens. That’s how we roll in our kitchen and with our believe that parents can teach their children to eat greens. Our kids are a great example. Of course they have their own taste and preferences, they don’t eat every available vegetable, but they do eat lots.

The trick is to keep on offering the greens, a wide set of differently prepared greens.

This guy eats broccoli, zucchini, paksoi and haricots. Just to name a few. He also eats loads of vegetables like carrots (oké, which child doesn’t eat carrots?), eggplant, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, pumpkin, potato, pea, sweet potato and beetroot.

And he loves tomato, which is by the way a fruit, but many people still regard it as a vegetable.

We taught our kids to eat vegetables in 3 simple ways.

  1. We started out by mixing vegetables with white rice or buckwheat. Or it was a smashed potato dish. With these purees we chose to add only one vegetable so they could get used to the taste of the added vegetable. We varied the purees with cooked or steamed vegetables they could eat out of their hands. (around 5 months)
  2. After the puree phase we cooked or steamed the vegetable so they could see, for example, the white rice separate from the vegetable. They used either their hands or a fork or spoon to eat their meal.
  3. We also offered vegetable soups. You could prepare pumpkin soup in such a way that your child can spoon it up himself. If it’s another type of vegetable you can add potato or even sweet potato to thicken it. Adding a bit of coconut flour is also an option. Actually any type of grain or rice is possible to thicken your vegetable soup.

And again: the trick is to keep on offering the greens and veggies.

Another good thing is to set the example: eat loads of greens and veggies right in front of your child’s nose. Children imitate. And while imitating they discover their own taste.

Meatless Mondays

This is an excellent initiative: Meatless Mondays. It’s an international campaign to improve your health and the health of the planet by eating less meat. In our household we eat at most two times a week meat. Actually our food patterns have changed quite a lot in 2011. Below a scrap from the blog ‘Looking back on 2011’. 

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As a part of Arnold’s fysical and emotional development he started to bake his own bread. After a visit to a mesoloog; someone who practices the art of identifying what nutrients the body needs, lacks or is allergic to. He needed to avoid some nutrients so we started to do more grocery shopping at the organic food stores. So besides white rice, potatoes, pasta we added quinoa, pasta made from spelt, pancakes made from spelt, buckwheat, couscous, corn, taro, cassava and a whole range of pulses. In 2008 I promised my grandfather to avoid the deep frozen fish from the supermarkets. In 2009 he passed away. In 2010 our daughter was born. And halfway through 2011 I decided to definitely switch to super fresh fish: keeping my promise. Ever since we buy our fish in Scheveningen or at the Hague market. With regards to meat; we started eating more organic meat. There is no definite switch from my side and by exception I eat non-organic meat served by restaurants, family or friends.

The Beautiful Truth

A troubled 15-year-old boy attempting to cope with the recent death of his mother sets out to research Dr. Max Gerson’s claims of a diet that can cure cancer as his first assignment for home-schooling in this documentary from filmmaker Steve Kroschel (Avalanche, Dying to Have Known). Garrett is a boy who has always been close to nature. He lives on a reserve with a menagerie of orphaned animals, and over the years he’s become especially sensitive to the nutritional needs of the diet-sensitive animals he’s charged with caring for. When Garrett’s mother suffers a tragic and untimely death, the boy falls into a dangerous downward spiral and nearly flunks out of school. Increasingly concerned for Garrett’s well-being and determined to strengthen their bond despite the many challenges on the horizon, his father makes the decision to begin home-schooling the distressed teen. Garrett’s first assignment: study a controversial book written by Dr. Max Gerson, a physician who claims to have discovered a diet that’s capable of curing cancer. Is Dr. Gerson’s therapy truly the legitimate, alternative cure it appears to be? In order to find out the truth behind this long-suppressed treatment, Garrett interviews not only Dr. Gerson’s family members, but various doctors, skeptics, and cancer patients as well. His studies completed and his findings revelatory, Garrett now sets out to tell the entire world about The Gerson Miracle.